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Underwater Photo Contest Entry

Taken by: Izwar Zakri

"FRECKLES"
Spotted this when doing some muck diving at ...
"FRECKLES" 
Spotted this when doing some muck diving at ... by Izwar Zakri
VOTES: 18
VOTE!


forum thread for this image
Posted: Friday, July 29, 2011- (7/29/2011 2:28:00 AM)
Category: Macro - Nudibranchia
location: South China Sea Vietnam
message this message is important Dear Izwar,
Thank for your latest submission to the UWP contest.

Izwar, this is a great photograph..I love it! Nice shallow depth of field, great diagonal composition, the exposure and lighting are good and the subject matter is well chosen with great colours. Well done!

My only criticism of this shot is that it would have been better if all parts of the rhinopores had been in focus. There are two ways this could have been achieved: 1. reducing your aperture by one stop and thereby slightly increasing depth of field to include both rhinopores (e.g. increasing your f-stop from (say) f5.6 to f8, or f11 to f16); or 2. putting both rhinopores at the same distance from the camera by choosing a more head-on angle. Using the second option you could achieve the same very narrow depth of field but have both rhinopores in focus.

Great shot Izwar, I look forward to seeing more of your work!

Regards,
Doug Anderson


 
Doug Anderson
14798 point member
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message Hi Doug

Still dabbling with the DSLR underwater, hence your feedback is much appreciated . Would definitely keep your crit in mind the next time I shoot.

Interesting work you have in your folio.

smile
 
Dp
64 point member
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message Thanks, glad to help smile
 
Doug Anderson
14798 point member
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